Minors in English Language and Literature

TESOL (6 Courses / 18 Credits–36 ECTS)

Explores the field of linguistics, and serves as a general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing with a focus on English. During the semester, students will investigate the basic theories and methods of the different areas of linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Topics include the intricate rule systems that govern language, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken language relates to written language. Prerequisites: GE105. Co-requisites: GE106. Credits: 3
Examines the structure of present-day English, and builds on the knowledge of syntax gained in ENG200. Though the term "grammar" is commonly used to refer to the prescriptive language rules, in this class the term is used to refer to the linguistic knowledge that speakers of a language share. The primary goal of this course is to make explicit the conventions native speakers of English know implicitly. It is designed to provide coverage of the major constructions of the different dialects of the English language. The course is designed to give students the tools needed to understand and discuss modern English grammar. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG200. Credits: 3
This course takes as point of departure a view of discourse as social action. Students will engage in the description and interpretation of spoken and written language in use in various settings: political contexts; the media, including advertising and social media; computer mediated communication; professional discourses-academic, health communication and business discourses. Topics to be explored will include genres and discourses; intertextuality and interdiscursivity; construction of identities; language, power and ideology; analysis of narratives; contrastive discourse analysis. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG200. Credits: 3
Introduces students to the principles of communicative language teaching. The course includes the theoretical and practical applications of teaching the four skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking and also examines the teaching of grammar. Students investigate different approaches to classroom management and lesson planning, as well as developing an awareness of how to choose materials and techniques appropriately for different age groups. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG200, ENG202. Co-requisites: ENG203. Credits: 3
Investigates the teaching of English in more advanced detail. The course examines special topics, such as materials evaluation and development, technology in education, dyslectic learners, phonetics and phonology, syllabus design, and error correction. In addition, testing and evaluation, drama in the classroom and the teaching of lexis, are explored. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG200, ENG202, ENG203, ENG310. Credits: 3
The course provides an introduction to research design in the field of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). Students will acquire the basic principles and skills needed to design and conduct classroom research. The course guides students through the research process: reviewing current literature, examining different methods, formulating research questions, selecting appropriate tools for collecting data, analyzing data and interpreting findings. Research topics include classroom interaction, teaching techniques, attitudes of teachers and learners and any other topics in classroom research relevant to the students’ interests. Prerequisite: PSY200, ENG200, ENG201, ENG202, ENG203, ENG300, ENG301, ENG310, ENG311, ENG410 (Practicum I). Credits: 3

Literature (6 Courses / 18 Credits–36 ECTS)

 
Requirements (2 Courses/ 6 Credits–12 ECTS)
Introduces students to literature by providing a broad overview of the three major genres: the short story, poetry, and drama, with some exposure to critical theory; discusses the elements of fiction, poetry and drama, such the role of setting, character, plot, theme, style, imagery, symbolism, metaphors, and tone in fiction and poetry, and the differences between ancient Greek and Shakespearean theatre. Students are introduced to representative texts and the historical/cultural contexts that produced them. Prerequisites: GE105. Co-requisites: GE106. Credits: 3
Surveys key texts in the American canon beginning with William Bradford, John Winthrop and Anne Bradstreet as well as Native American creation myths. A timeline of developments in nation-building and its literature from the Puritans and Native Americans through to the American Enlightenment and Renaissance will be explored, up through to contemporary American voices that address multicultural, racial and ethnic concerns regarding identity and belonging. Discussion will include the works of Emerson, Hawthorne, Wheatley, Jefferson, Lincoln, Jacobs, Hurston, Far and Alexei, among others. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG220. Credits: 3
Electives – Select 4 courses / 12 Credits (24 ECTS)
This course introduces students to the history and function of translation in society. Students learn the multiple ways in which translators work in multilingual and multicultural environments while they become familiar with the main theoretical streams in Translation Studies. Students understand the importance of translation as an area of study and come to appreciate the age-old role translators have played as mediators between societies and cultures. Students gain hands-on translation practice by translating texts from English into Greek. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106. Credits: 3
Explores the complex relationships between gender and language structure, use, and change, integrating perspectives from sociolinguistics and gender theory. Through readings, lectures, class discussions, and data analysis, students learn about gender-based differences in language use and communication and gender as a social construct that is shaped through language use; explore cross-cultural perspectives on language and gender; and examine the implications of language and gender research in institutional contexts, such as education, law, the media, and business. This course will appeal to students interested in a variety of professional fields, including English language teaching, journalism, psychology, and business. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG200. Credits: 3
Explores four major plays by William Shakespeare; "Hamlet", "Macbeth", "Romeo and Juliet" and "A Midsummer's Night's Dream", as well as several of his sonnets in the context of the English Renaissance. Attention is given to the use of language--puns, metaphors, and hidden meanings--in the plays and the poems. Classroom analysis focuses on key elements of Shakespeare's artistry, particularly the choice of setting in "Macbeth" and "Midsummer Night's Dream", the ghost scenes in "Macbeth" and "Hamlet", and the plays-within-the-plays in "Hamlet" and "Midsummer Night's Dream". The developing role of English theatre in general is explored. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG220. Credits: 3
Provides intensive study of the novel as a literary form based on close readings of representative texts from the 19th century to the present. Emphasis is given to the analysis of narrative, temporality, memory, voice and the status of the subject. The course analyses how economic and social influences (modern city, industrialism, transportation etc) as well as developments in the sciences (Darwin) influenced the 19th century novel (Dickens, Bronte, James, Hardy, G. Eliot). Aesthetic and cultural stakes are explored in radically varied constructions of modernity (Woolf, Joyce, Conrad, Lawrence, Rushdie). Finally, questions are addressed that relate to the colonial legacy and the globalized and "post-national" identities in the post-war novel. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG220. Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the history and function of translation in society. Students learn the multiple ways in which translators work in multilingual and multicultural environments while they become familiar with the main theoretical streams in Translation Studies. Students understand the importance of translation as an area of study and come to appreciate the age-old role translators have played as mediators between societies and cultures. Students gain hands-on translation practice by translating texts from English into Greek. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106. Credits: 3
Introduces students to Creative Writing in its most varied application, from writing for the media and the arts to experiments in the lyric essay, fiction and poetry; the attraction of this course is in its multi-genre and inter-disciplinary application. Students interested in journalism, script-writing, and creative non-fiction, will gain from this introduction as much as those interested in the beginnings of poetry and fiction writing. Readings will take place in the craft of the lyric, non-fiction essay, art reviews,
script writing, story, and poetry. Students learn the basic strategies for writing in multiple, non-academic styles while focusing on the genre of their choice. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG220. Credits: 3
Explores a range of short stories written in English and some works in translation. Students are acquainted with the hallmarks of short fiction and learn to appreciate the variety of styles and forms that have produced the short story genre. Particular attention is paid to what makes a short story its own, unique art form. Works by Chekhov, Flaubert to the more contemporary works of O'Connor, McCullers, Updike and Lahiri (among others), will be read and discussed. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG220. Credits: 3
Introduces students to a comparative approach to literature, gender theory and literary theory, by examining texts by women writers from different backgrounds, namely the UK, US, and Greece. Issues explored include: how (and if) texts by women differ from texts by men, recurring themes in women's writing and the way these have changed through the course of the 20th century, and the ways writing challenges or reinforces existing cultural norms about gender. Writers whose work will be studied is determined by the instructor, these have included, but are not limited to: Virginia Woolf, Kate Chopin, Flannery O'Conner, Toni Morrison, Lilika Nakou, Margarita Lymberaki, Zyranna Zateli. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106, ENG220. Credits: 3

Translation (6 Courses / 18 Credits–36 ECTS)

This course introduces students to the history and function of translation in society. Students learn the multiple ways in which translators work in multilingual and multicultural environments while they become familiar with the main theoretical streams in Translation Studies. Students understand the importance of translation as an area of study and come to appreciate the age-old role translators have played as mediators between societies and cultures. Students gain hands-on translation practice by translating texts from English into Greek. Prerequisites: GE105, GE106. Credits: 3
The course introduces students to the methodologies and tools necessary to carry out translations and addresses terminology analysis and terminology management. Students distinguish terms and non-terms, become familiar with online tools for translation and evaluate their reliability. They establish methodologies for identifying and managing their projects, while by conducting preliminary terminographical work they create their first monolingual and bilingual glossaries. Prerequisites: IT100, GE105, GE205, (Introduction to Translation Studies). Credits: 3
This course encourages and guides students in applying the theoretical and metholodological skills and techniques acquired for translating various texts from English into Greek raising awareness of translation as a process and product (target text). Students are introduced to source text analysis and become familiar with content and terminology analysis before engaging in a translation. The course provides insight to the steps of translation encouraging students to ‘pool in’ and utilize all previous theoretical and practical skills acquired. Students are assigned source texts from different genres and discourses to be translated into Greek, ultimately developing critical awareness of how the basic principles of translation theory can be applied in practice. Prerequisites: IT100, GE105, GE205 (Introduction to Translation Studies, Methodology and Terminology for Translation). Credits: 3
Students focus on the dimension of culture and culture transfer through translation and learn to treat texts as linguistic, cultural and ideological products. Attention is paid to issues of culture-bound items and untranslatability. Students enhance their cultural knowledge by analyzing various texts. Also, addressed is the issue of cultural preferences of both source and target environments. Prerequisites: GE105, GE205 (Introduction to Translation Studies). Credits: 3
This course encourages and guides students towards applying the theoretical and metholodological skills and techniques acquired for translating various texts from Greek into English raising awareness of translation as a process and product (target text).Students use the tools learned in previous courses to translate various texts from Greek into English including financial, legal, technical and promotional material. IT100, GE105, GE205 (Introduction to Translation Studies, Methodology and Terminology for Translation). Credits: 3
This course introduces translation as a practice carried out for specific purposes in the framework of a given society. Students are introduced to the aspect of translation as a cultural activity. Students understand the common cultural code, customs and traditions as foundations for translation and communication. The course will also look at the various roles a translator may assume as a mediator between different cultures and ideologies within a given social context. Prerequisites: IT 100, GE105, GE205 (Introduction to Translation Studies, Translation and Culture, Fundamentals for Translation I (English-Greek). Credits: 3

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